A New Business Location And Making It Right For Your Venture

When you get to a stage with your business and you are able to  move somewhere and take that next step, it can be very exciting and overwhelming. However, not all locations will suit your needs from the start and this is when you may need to make some drastic changes. Renovations can be anything from changing the interior of a room or adding extensions and knocking down walls. So if you find you are about to embark on the renovation process for your business location then this article is for you. Here are some of the things to think about to help you make your business location work for your venture.

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Image source – Pixabay – CC0 License 

You need a project manager

It will be impossible to continue ruining your business efficiently and being on site to manage the project of a renovation process so it is a good idea to ensure that you hire someone who can take on this role for you. Someone you can trust to make big decisions in your absence. Having a project manager means there is less likely of delays as a contractor waits for you. 

Don’t just stick with one quote

Like with anything, get yourself a few different quotes to work with. This helps you to distinguish what the overall job is going to cost and for you to consider different options or try and source the best possible price and timescale for the jobs you want to do. 

Have the experts in to do the tricky jobs

It can be extremely tempting to keep costs down by doing some of the work yourself or using friends and family to help out. However, if you or any of those family members are not qualified to be doing the job that you are doing then this can end up costing you more in the long term. Consider what you spend your money on and where you cash in your favors. Jobs like cleaning up and painting are ideal for you and friends, where as plumbing and reworking electrics is best left to the professionals. For the trickier jobs like that, this is when it is easy to overlook things such as finding the right float switch manufacturer for liquid tanks or ensuring that you manage to wire the right sort of lighting and power supply for the type of work that is needed. 

Don’t forget about planning, building codes and regulations 

Finally, make sure before any work is undertaken that you have gained the right level of permissions and followed any regulations in place. This causes you less heartache and pain during the build process if all of sudden something isn’t up to code. A great tip is to do all of the planning ahead of time with an architect and submit designs for approval. It may take some time, but the planning side of things is always best done before any work happens so that you can ensure you are doing everything according to agreed plans and permission granted. 

Let’s hope these tips help you to create the right business location for your venture. 

Comments

  1. Diane Brimmer says

    Luckly I didn’t have to worry about a location for our business. We processed our products at home and we had all of the inspections and licenses done. We took our products to several different Farmer’s Markets in surrounding cities near us. We also had to carry our license and inspection certificate on board.

  2. Tamra Phelps says

    I’d say it would be quite a chore to change locations! But if you’re business is growing, you might have to move.

  3. I feel like renovations are one of the most overlooked things when it comes to setting up a new location – and it’s so critical! Your ambiance needs to match your mission!

  4. Our town has built a town center, a big investor came in and transformed the area with storefronts, etc. We’ve seen some thrive, and many come and go. What I’ve seen is some make the same mistake of not researching whether it would be good for them, there are parts of the center that don’t get any foot traffic, hard to park, etc., and the biz starves. Also, it is shocking how long it takes from the time they get a key, to be able to open, the amount of labor and efforts to re-do a space to their needs, all that, and then some are open a couple months only before they shut down. Some their location appears wonderful, but have had at least a dozen come and go within a few years. The few that have thrived made wise choices, and also have had enough capital to weather the time period of getting started, or are a chain restaurant. It would be good to hire a firm to research a good location.

  5. Rosie’s made an excellent point: location. No point moving to where the overheads are cheaper if you’re not going to get noticed.

  6. Tamra Phelps says

    True. My hometown built this huge ‘business/shopping’ area, but they built it in a spot where residents rarely go. Now, it had a huge parking area. But that just didn’t make up for the fact that people rarely go there. To this day, it’s mostly empty except for one strip that houses government offices.

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